Monthly Archives: August 2014

Gruesome Tales Surface of Israeli Massacres Against Families in Gaza Neighborhood by Max Blumenthal

Reblogged from AlterNet

 

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AlterNet / By Max Blumenthal comments_image 86 COMMENTS
Gruesome Tales Surface of Israeli Massacres Against Families in Gaza Neighborhood
Visiting what remains of Shujaiya yields evidence of massacres and stories of impossible courage.
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August 17, 2014 |

As the five-day ceasefire between Israel and Hamas took hold on August 15, residents of Shujaiya returned to the shattered remains of their homes. They pitched tents and erected signs asserting their claim to their property, sorting determinedly through the ruins of their lives.

Those who managed to survive the Israeli bombardment have come home to bedrooms obliterated by tank shells, kitchens pierced by Hellfire missiles, and boudoirs looted by soldiers who used their homes as bases of operations before embarking on a series of massacres. Once a solidly middle-class suburb of Gaza City comprised of multi-family apartments and stately homes, the neighborhood of Shujaiya was transformed into a gigantic crime scene.

The attack on Shujaiya began at 11pm on July 19, with a combined Israeli bombardment from F-16s, tanks and mortar launchers. It was a night of hell which more than 100 did not survive and that none have recovered from. Inside the ruins of what used to be homes, returning locals related stories of survival and selflessness, detailing a harrowing night of death and destruction.

Outside a barely intact four-level, multi-family home that was hardly distinguishable from the other mangled structures lining the dusty roads of Shujaiya, I met members of the Atash family reclining on mats beside a makeshift stove. Khalil Atash, the 63-year-old patriarch of the family, motioned to his son heating a teapot above a few logs and muttered, “They’ve set us back a hundred years. Look at us, we’re now burning wood to survive.”

Click to enlarge.
Bombed-out remnants of Shujaiya after Israeli bombing. Photo by Max Blumenthal.

Khalil Atash led me inside the home to see the damage. The walls of the second floor that was to have been home to two of his newly married children had been blown off by tank shells. All that was left of the bathroom were the hot and cold knobs on the shower. On the next floor, four small children scampered barefoot across shattered glass and jagged shards of concrete. A bunk bed and crib were badly singed in the attack. But the damage could have been far worse.

Khalil Atash with his grandson in the ruins of his home in Shujaiya. Photo credit: Dan Cohen
Click to enlarge.
Khalil Atash with his grandson in the ruins of his home in Shujaiya. Photo by Dan Cohen.

As the attack on Shujaiya began, the Israeli army attempted to evacuate the Atash family, according to Khalil Atash, phoning them and ordering them out in Arabic. But the family was sure the call was a prank. When the army called again, a soldier exclaimed, “You think this is a joke? You have five minutes.” Three minutes later, an F-16 sent a missile through the roof. In an incredible stroke of luck, the missile did not explode. It remained lodged in the ceiling until a day prior to my visit, when a bomb detonation crew dismantled it.

I asked why the family remained in ruins when the army could attack again at any time.

“We have nowhere else to go now,” Khalil Atash explained. “You only die once and we’re not afraid after what we’ve been through. So we just decided to live in our house.”

The Atash family was among only a small handful willing to brave the nights in an area that was comprehensively flattened. Shujaiya stood within the long swath of Gaza Strip towns and cities that had been rendered uninhabitable by Israeli bombardment. All of these areas had one thing in common: They abutted the vast buffer zone the Israeli military had established between its border and the Gaza Strip. By pounding neighborhoods like Shujiaya and cities like Beit Hanoun until nearly all of their residents were forced to flee west for shelter, Israel was tightening the cage on the entire population.

Sprint for Survival

Khalil Atash’s son, 30-year-old Tamer, related his story of survival.

“The missiles started getting closer and began to hit everywhere so randomly,” he recalled, detailing how the strikes on Shujaiya gradually intensified after the first hour. “So I just lost it. I was watching my neighbors die and I was so close to them, I felt like I was dead too. I had two choices: Either I die doing nothing at that house or do something about it. So I chose to do something.”

Tamer called an ambulance crew and begged the driver to help transport his family out of the attack. “All I can do is pray for you,” the driver told him. But other first responders rushed headlong into the maelstrom, risking their lives to save as many of the fleeing residents as they could. By this time, the neighborhood was engulfed in flames and shrouded in darkness — Israeli forces had bombed all of its electricity towers. He and his family decided to make a run for it in the street. Neighbors followed closely behind them, embarking on a desperate sprint for survival as homes went up in flames around them.

Relying on cellphone flashlights to illuminate their path, the fleeing residents rushed ahead under withering shelling. Tens of people fell every few hundred meters, Tamer told me. But they continued anyway, sprinting for a full kilometer until they reached safety close to Gaza City.

As soon as he reached sanctuary, Tamer said he was overcome with guilt. Friends and neighbors were stuck in the neighborhood with no one to evacuate them. He decided to return to help anyone he could. “I’m from Shujaiyia, I have no other place to go, and we don’t own land,” he explained. “This is our only place here. So of course I came back.”

It was well past midnight, Shujaiya was in flames, and the Qassam Brigades — Hamas’ armed wing — was beginning to mobilize for a counterattack. “The situation outside was literally hell,” Tamer said.

In previous assaults on Gaza, Israeli forces met only light resistance. During Operation Cast Lead in 2008-09, when the army attacked Gaza’s civilian population with indiscriminate firepower, most Israeli casualties were the result of fratricide. But this time was different. With little more than light weapons at their disposal, uniformed Qassam fighters engaged the Israelis at close distances, sometimes just a few meters away, exposing a glaring weakness of the Middle East’s most heavily equipped, technologically advanced armies. During the battle, Qassam fighters scored a hit on an Israeli armored personnel carrier, killing five soldiers inside, then momentarily captured the fatally wounded Lt. Shaul Oron.

The loss of soldiers and the possible capture of Oron — a situation that raised the specter of a politically devastating prisoner swap — sent Israeli forces into a vengeful frenzy. “The F-16s were no longer up in the sky bombing us, they were flying just above the houses,” Tamer recalled. “It felt like an atomic bomb with four F-16s coming one way and another four from the opposite direction, weaving between the houses. At this point, we realized we were not surviving. We said our last prayers, and that was it. Because we know that when the Israelis lose one of their soldiers they become lunatics. We just knew they had suffered something, we could sense it.”

Tamer watched some of his neighbors jump from fourth-floor windows as their homes burst into flames. Others rushed out in their night clothes, nearly nude, prompting him and other men to hand over their shirts and even their trousers to women scurrying half exposed through the darkened streets. After giving the shirt off his back to one woman, he gave his sandals to another who had sliced her feet open on rubble.

“Sure, I was crazy and stupid, but I just wanted for them to survive,” he said. “If I had to die, then fine, but someone had to make a sacrifice.”

By dawn, waves of survivors poured from Shujaiya into Gaza City. Sons had carried their fathers on their backs; mothers had hoisted children into lorries and ambulances; others searched frantically for missing family when they arrived, only to learn that they had fallen under the shelling. For many, it was another Nakba, a hellish reincarnation of the fateful days of 1948 when Zionist militias forcibly expelled hundreds of thousands of Palestinians from their land. This time, however, there was almost nowhere for the refugees to flee.

Evidence of Chilling Plans

Back in Shujaiya, the shelling momentarily subsided for a one-hour ceasefire. But the International Committee of the Red Cross proved unable to evacuate those trapped in the area, possibly because of the Israeli army’s refusal to coordinate with its first responders or because the army had targeted its ambulances in airstrikes. Thus the stragglers and wounded were at the mercy of Israel’s Golani Brigade special forces troops, which had taken up positions at the edge of Shujaiya, occupying homes just east of the area’s main mosque.

I visited almost a dozen homes occupied by Israeli soldiers in eastern Shujaiya, wading through rubble and piles of shattered furniture in search of clues into the Israeli plans of operation. I found floors littered with bullet casings, sandbags used as foundations for heavy machine guns, sniper holes punched into walls just inches above floors, and piles of empty Israeli snack food containers.

In the stairwell at the entrance to one home I visited, soldiers had engraved a Star of David. In another, soldiers used markers to scrawl in mangled Arabic, “We did not want to enter Gaza but terrorist Hamas made us enter. Damn terrorist Hamas and their supporters.”

I found a wall in another home vandalized with the symbol of Beitar Jerusalem, the Jerusalem-based football club popular among the hardcore cadres of Israel’s right-wing. Below the Beitar logo was the slogan, “Price Tag,” referring to the vigilante terror attacks carried out by Jewish settlers against Palestinians in the occupied West Bank.

Click to enlarge.
Graffiti by Israeli soldiers in a home in Shujaiya reads, “Price Tag.” Photo by Max Blumenthal.

In each home the soldiers occupied, I found walls etched with crude maps of the immediate vicinity. Each house was assigned a number, possibly to enable commanders to call in air and artillery strikes ahead of their forward positions. Names of soldiers, including those wounded or missing, were listed on several walls, but they were concealed with spray paint upon the troops’ departure.

In the ruins of a second-floor bedroom, in an empty ammo box under a tattered bed, a colleague discovered two laminated maps of Shujaiya. They were photographed by satellite at 10:32am on July 17, just days before the neighborhood was flattened. The date in the upper-right-hand corner of one map was written American-style, with the month before the day, raising the question of whether a US or Israeli satellite had captured the image. Outlined in orange was a row of homes numbered between 16 and 29; the homes immediately to their west were labeled with arrows indicating forward troop movements.

Click to enlarge.
A map of Israeli army operations discovered in a destroyed home in Shujaiya. Photo by Max Blumenthal.

A local man who had accompanied us into the house pointed at the homes on the map outlined in orange, then motioned out the window to where they once stood. Every single house in that row had been obliterated by airstrikes. I looked back at the map and noticed that the dusty field we faced was labeled in Hebrew, “Soccer Field.” Two areas just west of the field were marked, “T.A. South” and “T.A. North,” perhaps a cryptic reference to Tel Aviv. Devised at least two days before the assault, the map sectioned Shujaiya into various areas of operation, with color-coded delineations that were impossible to decipher but suggested disturbing intentions.

Eran Efrati, a former Israeli combat soldier turned anti-occupation activist, interviewed several soldiers who participated in the assault on Shujaiya. “I can report that the official command that was handed down to the soldiers in Shujaiya was to capture Palestinian homes as outposts,” Efrati wrote. “From these posts, the soldiers drew an imaginary red line, and amongst themselves decided to shoot to death anyone who crosses it. Anyone crossing the line was defined as a threat to their outposts, and was thus deemed a legitimate target. This was the official reasoning inside the units.”

In the area occupied by Israeli soldiers, the killing that had previously taken place by air and distant artillery assaults took on a gruesomely intimate quality. It was there, in the ruins of their homes, that returning locals told me of the cold-blooded execution of their family members.

Massacres in Broad Daylight

At the eastern edge of the “Soccer Field” now occupied by tents and surrounded by demolished five-story apartment complexes, I met Mohammed Fathi Al Areer. A middle-aged man wearing an eyepatch, he led me through the first floor of his home, which was now a virtual cave furnished with a single sofa, then into what used to be his backyard, where the interior of his bedroom had been exposed by a tank shell. It was here, Al Areer told me, that four of his brothers were executed in cold blood. One of them, Hassan Al Areer, was mentally disabled and had little idea he was about to be killed. Mohammed Al Areer said he found bullet casings next to their heads when he discovered their decomposing bodies.

Just next door was the Shamaly family, one of the hardest hit in Shujaiya. Hesham Naser Shamaly, 25, described to me what happened when five members of his family decided to stay in their home to guard the thousands of dollars of clothing stocks they planned to sell through their family business. When soldiers approached the home with weapons drawn, Shamaly said his father emerged from the home with his hands up and attempted to address them in Hebrew.

“He couldn’t even finish the sentence before they shot him,” Shamaly told me. “He was only injured and fainted, but they thought he was dead so they left him there and moved on to the others. They shot the rest — my uncle, my uncle’s wife, and my two cousins — they shot them dead.”

Miraculously, Shamaly’s father managed to revive himself after laying bleeding for almost three days. He walked on his own strength toward Gaza City and found medical help. “Someone called me to tell me he was alive,” Shamaly said, “and I thought it was a joke.”

Hesham Shamaly’s 22-year-old cousin, Salem, was also executed by the Israeli soldiers who had taken up positions in the neighborhood. When Salem Shamaly returned to his neighborhood during the temporary ceasefire at 3:30pm on July 20 to search for missing family members alongside members of the International Solidarity Movement (ISM), he apparently crossed the imaginary red line drawn by the soldiers. When he waded into a pile of rubble, a single shot rang out from a nearby sniper, sending his body crumpling to the ground. As he attempted to get up, another shot struck him in the chest. A third shot left his body limp.

The incident was captured on camera by a local activist named Muhammad Abedullah, then disseminated across the world by the ISM. Israeli military spokespeople were strangely silent. Back in Gaza City, where survivors of the Shamaly family had taken shelter in a relative’s apartment, Salem Shamaly’s sister and cousin received an emailed link to the video.

Over the next three minutes, they watched Salem die. They knew it was him because they recognized the sound of his voice as he cried out for help.

Despair and Resistance

In an apartment on Remad Street in Gaza City, I met the parents, siblings and cousins of Salem Shamaly. They had been forced to relocate here after their home was completely obliterated by Israeli tank shells and drone strikes in Shujaiya. The apartment was crowded but impeccably clean. It was a more desirable arrangement than one of the UN schools where most of their neighbors lodged in squalid conditions with little to no privacy, though no less an indignity.

Salem Shamaly’s father, 62-year-old Khalil, said the family evacuated Shujaiya at 8am. As soon as they reached safety, they realized Salem was missing. “It’s impossible to put into words how difficult it was,” Khalil Shamaly said. “We waited for two or three days not knowing and when we found out, it was too difficult to handle. I have had to call on God and he helped me.”

The attacks on Shujaiya continued for days, making it impossible for the Shamaly family to retrieve Salem’s body. They beseeched the ICRC for help but after so many attacks on their vehicles from the Israeli army, which had declared all of Shujaiya a “closed military zone,” they were unwilling to approach the area. Salem’s father, Khalil, still believes his son might have been saved if he was evacuated right away.

When Salem’s family finally retrieved his body, they found it badly burned, almost unrecognizable, and tossed dozens of meters from the location where he had been killed by subsequent bombardments. The death toll had reached such unbearable levels he could not be buried in Shujaiya, where the cemetery was overfull. When Shamaly’s finally found a place to bury him, they had to open a pre-existing grave because that cemetery was also full. This was just one of many stories I heard this week of a rushed burial, a family thrown into chaos, and a young life truncated and denied dignity in death.

Salem’s cousin, Hind Al Qattawi, whipped out a laptop and played for me a clip of a report on the killing by NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin. Al Qattawi had wanted to demonstrate for me the international impact the incident made, but instead, she summoned barely submerged emotions back to the surface. As soon as the video of Salem’s murder began to play, his mother, Amina, sobbed openly.

“The real problem is not just losing your home in the bombardment,” Muhammad Al Qattawi, the brother of Hind, told me. “The problem is you have lost your future, you lose your hope, and you can even lose your mind. Two million people here are on the verge of losing their minds.”

He handed me a packet of pills that had been prescribed to various family members. Deprived of justice, they had been given antidepressants to numb their despair.

Among those suffering most was Salem’s younger brother. The slightly built 14-year-old recalled his brother as a bright accounting student who paid for his education by working in his father’s corner store. He was one of his best friends.

“We used to go out with him whenever we were bored and he used to take us places,” Waseem said, fighting back tears. “Now, he’s gone, and there’s no one else to fill his place.”

When Waseem recovered, I asked him what he wanted to be when he came of age. He replied without pause that he planned to join the resistance. A look of intentness had replaced his sorrow. He said he had not considered becoming a fighter until the war came down on Shujaiya.

Max Blumenthal is a senior writer for AlterNet, and the author of Goliath and Republican Gomorrah (Basic/Nation Books, 2009). Find him on Twitter at @MaxBlumenthal.

Squeeze the tenant dry – the latest cunning landlord stunt?

Squeezing social tenants dry – yet another wheeze to milk the cash cows who cannot just up sticks and go.
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Over 300 Survivors and Descendants of Survivors of Victims of the Nazi Genocide Condemn Israel’s Assault on Gaza. Reblogged from Global Research.

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Over 300 Survivors and Descendants of Survivors of Victims of the Nazi Genocide Condemn Israel’s Assault on Gaza

By Global Research News
Global Research, August 16, 2014
International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network
Region: Middle East & North Africa
Theme: Crimes against Humanity
In-depth Report: PALESTINE
14 14 3 34

313 Jewish survivors and descendants of survivors and victims of the Nazi genocide have signed this letter written in response to Elie Wiesel’s manipulation of the Nazi Genocide to attempt to justify the attacks on Gaza.

As Jewish survivors and descendants of survivors and victims of the Nazi genocide we unequivocally condemn the massacre of Palestinians in Gaza and the ongoing occupation and colonization of historic Palestine. We further condemn the United States for providing Israel with the funding to carry out the attack, and Western states more generally for using their diplomatic muscle to protect Israel from condemnation. Genocide begins with the silence of the world.

We are alarmed by the extreme, racist dehumanization of Palestinians in Israeli society, which has reached a fever-pitch. In Israel, politicians and pundits in The Times of Israel and The Jerusalem Post have called openly for genocide of Palestinians and right-wing Israelis are adopting Neo-Nazi insignia.

Furthermore, we are disgusted and outraged by Elie Wiesel’s abuse of our history in these pages to promote blatant falsehoods used to justify the unjustifiable: Israel’s wholesale effort to destroy Gaza and the murder of nearly 2,000 Palestinians, including many hundreds of children. Nothing can justify bombing UN shelters, homes, hospitals and universities. Nothing can justify depriving people of electricity and water.

We must raise our collective voices and use our collective power to bring about an end to all forms of racism, including the ongoing genocide of Palestinian people. We call for an immediate end to the siege against and blockade of Gaza. We call for the full economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel. “Never again” must mean NEVER AGAIN FOR ANYONE!

Signed,

Survivors:

Hajo Meyer, survivor of Auschwitz, The Netherlands.
Henri Wajnblum, survivor and son of a victim of Auschwitz from Lodz, Poland. Lives in Belgium.
Renate Bridenthal, child refugee from Hitler, granddaughter of Auschwitz victim, United States.
Marianka Ehrlich Ross, survivor of Nazi ethnic cleansing in Vienna, Austria. Now lives in United States.
Irena Klepfisz, child survivor from the Warsaw Ghetto, Poland. Now lives in United States.
Hedy Epstein, her parents & other family members were deported to Camp de Gurs & subsequently all perished in Auschwitz. Now lives in United States.
Lillian Rosengarten, survivor of the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
Suzanne Weiss, survived in hiding in France, and daughter of a mother who was murdered in Auschwitz. Now lives in Canada.
H. Richard Leuchtag, survivor, United States.
Ervin Somogyi, survivor and son of survivors, United States.
Ilse Hadda, survivor on Kindertransport to England. Now lives in United States.
Jacques Glaser, survivor, France.
Norbert Hirschhorn, refugee of Nazi genocide and grandson of three grandparents who died in the Shoah, London.
Eva Naylor, surivor, New Zealand.
Suzanne Ross, child refugee from Nazi occupation in Belgium, two thirds of family perished in the Lodz Ghetto, in Auschwitz, and other Camps, United States.
Bernard Swierszcz, Polish survivor, lost relatives in Majdanek concentration camp. Now lives in the United States.
Joseph Klinkov, hidden child in Poland, still lives in Poland.
Nicole Milner, survivor from Belgium. Now lives in United States.
Hedi Saraf, child survivor and daughter of survivor of Dachau, United States.
Michael Rice, child survivor, son and grandson of survivor, aunt and cousin murderd, ALL 14 remaining Jewish children in my Dutch boarding school were murdered in concentration camps, United States.
Barbara Roose, survivor from Germany, half-sister killed in Auschwitz, United States.
Sonia Herzbrun, survivor of Nazi genocide, France.
Ivan Huber, survivor with my parents, but 3 of 4 grandparents murdered, United States.
Altman Janina, survivor of Janowski concentration camp, Lvov. Lives in Israel.
Leibu Strul Zalman, survivor from Vaslui Romania. Lives in Jerusalem, Palestine.
Miriam Almeleh, survivor, United States.
George Bartenieff, child survivor from Germany and son of survivors, United States.
Margarete Liebstaedter, survivor, hidden by Christian people in Holland. Lives in Belgium.
Edith Bell, survivor of Westerbork, Theresienstadt, Auschwitz and Kurzbach. Lives in United States.
Janine Euvrard, survivor, France.
Harry Halbreich, survivor, German.
Ruth Kupferschmidt, survivor, spent five years hiding, The Netherlands.
Annette Herskovits, PhD, hidden child and daughter of victims, United States.
Felicia & Moshe Langer, survivors from Germany, Moshe survived 5 concentration camps, family members were exterminated. Live in Germany.
Adam Policzer, hidden child from Hungary. Now lives in Canada.
Juliane Biro, survivor via the Kindertransport to England, daughter of survivors, niece of victims, United States.
Edith Rubinstein, child refugee, granddaughter of 3 victims, many other family members were victims, Belgium.
Jacques Bude, survivor, mother and father murdered in Auschwitz, Belgium.
Nicole Kahn, survivor, France.
Children of survivors:

Liliana Kaczerginski, daughter of Vilna ghetto resistance fighter and granddaughter of murdered in Ponary woods, Lithuania. Now lives in France.
Jean-Claude Meyer, son of Marcel, shot as a hostage by the Nazis, whose sister and parents died in Auschwitz. Now lives in France.
Chava Finkler, daughter of survivor of Starachovice labour camp, Poland. Now lives in Canada.
Micah Bazant, child of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Sylvia Schwarz, daughter and granddaughter of survivors and granddaughter of victims of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Margot Goldstein, daughter and granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Ellen Schwarz Wasfi, daughter of survivors from Vienna, Austria. Now lives in United States.
Lisa Kosowski, daughter of survivor and granddaughter of Auschwitz victims, United States.
Daniel Strum, son of a refugee from Vienna, who, with his parents were forced to flee in 1939, his maternal grand-parents were lost, United States.
Bruce Ballin, son of survivors, some relatives of parents died in camps, one relative beheaded for being in the Baum Resistance Group, United States.
Rachel Duell, daughter of survivors from Germany and Poland, United States.
Tom Mayer, son of survivor and grandson of victims, United States.
Alex Nissen, daughter of survivors who escaped but lost family in the Holocaust, United States.
Mark Aleshnick, son of survivor who lost most of her family in Nazi genocide, United States.
Prof. Haim Bresheeth, son of two survivors of Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen, London.
Todd Michael Edelman, son and grandson of survivors and great-grandson of victims of the Nazi genocide in Hungary, Romania and Slovakia, United States.
Tim Naylor, son of survivor, New Zealand.
Victor Nepomnyashchy, son and grandson of survivors and grandson and relative of many victims, United States.
Tanya Ury, daughter of parents who fled Nazi Germany, granddaughter, great granddaugher and niece of survivors and those who died in concentration camps, Germany.
Rachel Giora, daughter of Polish Jews who fled Poland, Israel.
Jane Hirschmann, daughter of survivors, United States.
Jenny Heinz, daughter of survivor, United States.
Jaap Hamburger, son of survivors and grandchild of 4 grandparents murdered in Auschwitz, The Netherlands.
Elsa Auerbach, daughter of Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, United States.
Julian Clegg, son and grandson of Austrian refugees, relative of Austrian and Hungarian concentration camp victims, Taiwan.
David Mizner, son of a survivor, relative of people who died in the Holocaust, United States.
Jeffrey J. Westcott, son and grandson of Holocaust survivors from Germany, United States.
Susan K. Jacoby, daughter of parents who were refugees from Nazi Germany, granddaughter of survivor of Buchenwald, United States.
Audrey Bomse, daughter of a survivor of Nazi ethnic cleansing in Vienna, lives in United States.
Daniel Gottschalk, son and grandson of refugees from the Holocaust, relative to various family members who died in the Holocaust, United States.
Barbara Grossman, daughter of survivors, granddaughter of Holocaust victims, United States.
Abraham Weizfeld PhD, son of survivorswho escaped Warsaw (Jewish Bundist) and Lublin ghettos, Canada.
David Rohrlich, son of refugees from Vienna, grandson of victim, United States.
Walter Ballin, son of holocaust survivors, United States.
Fritzi Ross, daughter of survivor, granddaughter of Dachau survivor Hugo Rosenbaum, great-granddaughter and great-niece of victims, United States.
Reuben Roth, son of survivors who fled from Poland in 1939, Canada.
Tony Iltis, father fled from Czechoslovakia and grandmother murdered in Auschwitz, Australia.
Anne Hudes, daughter and granddaughter of survivors from Vienna, Austria, great-granddaughter of victims who perished in Auschwitz, United States.
Mateo Nube, son of survivor from Berlin, Germany. Lives in United States.
John Mifsud, son of survivors from Malta, United States.
Mike Okrent, son of two holocaust / concentration camp survivors, United States.
Susan Bailey, daughter of survivor and niece of victims, UK.
Brenda Lewis, child of Kindertransport survivor, parent’s family died in Auschwitz and Terezin. Lives in Canada.
Patricia Rincon-Mautner, daughter of survivor and granddaughter of survivor, Colombia.
Barak Michèle, daughter and grand-daughter of a survivor, many members of family were killed in Auschwitz or Bessarabia. Lives in Germany.
Jessica Blatt, daughter of child refugee survivor, both grandparents’ entire families killed in Poland. Lives in United States
Maia Ettinger, daughter & granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Ammiel Alcalay, child of survivors from then Yugoslavia. Lives in United States.
Julie Deborah Kosowski, daughter of hidden child survivor, grandparents did not return from Auschwitz, United States.
Julia Shpirt, daughter of survivor, United States.
Ruben Rosenberg Colorni, grandson and son of survivors, The Netherlands.
Victor Ginsburgh, son of survivors, Belgium.
Arianne Sved, daughter of a survivor and granddaughter of victim, Spain.
Rolf Verleger, son of survivors, father survived Auschwitz, mother survived deportation from Berlin to Estonia, other family did not survive. Lives in Germany.
Euvrard Janine, daughter of survivors, France.
H. Fleishon, daughter of survivors, United States.
Barbara Meyer, daughter of survivor in Polish concentration camps. Lives in Italy.
Susan Heuman, child of survivors and granddaughter of two grandparents murdered in a forest in Minsk. Lives in United States.
Rami Heled, son of survivors, all grandparents and family killed by the Germans in Treblinka, Oswiecim and Russia. Lives in Israel.
Eitan Altman, son of survivor, France.
Jorge Sved, son of survivor and grandson of victim, United Kingdom
Maria Kruczkowska, daughter of Lea Horowicz who survived the holocaust in Poland. Lives in Poland.
Sarah Lanzman, daughter of survivor of Auschwitz, United States.
Cheryl W, daughter, granddaughter and nieces of survivors, grandfather was a member of the Dutch Underground (Eindhoven). Lives in Australia.
Chris Holmquist, son of survivor, UK.
Beverly Stuart, daughter and granddaughter of survivors from Romania and Poland. Lives in United States.
Peter Truskier, son and grandson of survivors, United States.
Karen Bermann, daughter of a child refugee from Vienna. Lives in United States.
Rebecca Weston, daughter and granddaughter of survivor, Spain.
Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky, daughter of Holocaust survivors, London, UK.
Marion Geller, daughter and granddaughter of those who escaped, great-granddaughter and relative of many who died in the camps, UK.
Susan Slyomovics, daughter and granddaughter of survivors of Auschwitz, Plaszow, Markleeberg and Ghetto Mateszalka, United States.
Helga Fischer Mankovitz, daughter, niece and cousin of refugees who fled from Austria, niece of victim who perished, Canada.
Michael Wischnia, son of survivors and relative of many who perished, United States.
Arthur Graaff, son of decorated Dutch resistance member and nazi victim, The Netherlands.
Yael Kahn, daughter of survivors who escaped Nazi Germany, many relatives that perished, UK.
Pierre Stambul, son of French resistance fighters, father deported to Buchenwalk, grandparents disapeared in Bessarabia, France.
Georges Gumpel, son of a deportee who died at Melk, Austria (subcamp of Mauthausen), France.
Emma Kronberg, daughter of survivor Buchenwald, United States.
Hannah Schwarzschild, daughter of a refugee who escaped Nazi Germany after experiencing Kristallnacht, United States.
Rubin Kantorovich, son of a survivor, Canada.
Daniele Armaleo, son of German refugee, grandparents perished in Theresienstadt, United States.
Aminda Stern Baird, daughter of survivor, United States.
Ana Policzer, daughter of hidden child, granddaughter of victim, niece/grandniece of four victims and two survivors, Canada.
Sara Castaldo, daughter of survivors, United States.
Pablo Policzer, son of a survivor, Canada.
Gail Nestel, daughter of survivors who lost brothers, sisters, parents and cousins, Canada.
Elizabeth Heineman, daughter and niece of unaccompanied child refugees, granddaughter of survivors, great-granddaughter and grand-niece of victims, United States.
Lainie Magidsohn, daughter of child survivor and numerous other relatives from Czestochowa, Poland. Lives in Canada.
Doris Gelbman, daughter and granddaughter of survivors, granddaughter and niece of many who perished, United States.
Erna Lund, daughter of survivor, Norway.
Rayah Feldman, daughter of refugees, granddaughter and niece of victims and survivors, UK.
Hadas Rivera-Weiss, daughter of survivors from Hungary, mother Ruchel Weiss née Abramovich and father Shaya Weiss, United States.
Pedro Tabensky, son of survivor of the Budapest Ghetto, South Africa.
Allan Kolski Horwitz, son of a survivor; descendant of many, many victims, South Africa.
Monique Mojica, child of survivor, relative to many victims murdered in Auschwitz. Canada.
Mike Brecher, son of a Kindertransport survivor and grandson of two who did not survive. UK.
Grandchildren of survivors

Raphael Cohen, grandson of Jewish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Emma Rubin, granddaughter of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Alex Safron, grandson of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Danielle Feris, grandchild of a Polish grandmother whose whole family died in the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
Jesse Strauss, grandson of Polish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Anna Baltzer, granddaughter of survivors whose family members perished in Auschwitz (others were members of the Belgian Resistance), United States.
Abigail Harms, granddaughter of Holocaust survivor from Austria, Now lives in United States.
Tessa Strauss, granddaughter of Polish Jewish survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Caroline Picker, granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Amalle Dublon, grandchild and great-grandchild of survivors of the Nazi holocaust, United States.
Antonie Kaufmann Churg, 3rd cousin of Ann Frank and grand-daughter of NON-survivors, United States.
Aliza Shvarts, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Linda Mamoun, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Abby Okrent, granddaughter of survivors of the Auschwitz, Dachau, Stuttgart, and the Lodz Ghetto, United States.
Ted Auerbach, grandson of survivor whose whole family died in the Holocaust, United States.
Beth Bruch, grandchild of German Jews who fled to US and great-grandchild of Nazi holocaust survivor, United States.
Bob Wilson, grandson of a survivor, United States.
Katharine Wallerstein, granddaughter of survivors and relative of many who perished, United States.
Sylvia Finzi, granddaughter and niece of Holocaust victims murdered in Auschwitz, London and Berlin. Now lives in London.
Esteban Schmelz, grandson of KZ-Theresienstadt victim, Mexico City.
Françoise Basch, grand daughter of Victor and Ilona Basch murdered by the Gestapo and the French Milice, France.
Gabriel Alkon, grandson of Holocaust survivors, Untied States.
Nirit Ben-Ari, grandchild of Polish grandparents from both sides whose entire family was killed in the Nazi Holocaust, United States.
Heike Schotten, granddaughter of refugees from Nazi Germany who escaped the genocide, United States.
Ike af Carlstèn, grandson of survivor, Norway.
Elias Lazarus, grandson of Holocaust refugees from Dresden, United States and Australia.
Laura Mandelberg, granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, United States.
Josh Ruebner, grandson of Nazi Holocaust survivors, United States.
Shirley Feldman, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Nuno Cesar Ferreira, grandson of survivor, Brazil.
Andrea Land, granddaugher of survivors who fled programs in Poland, all European relatives died in German and Polish concentration camps, United States.
Sarah Goldman, granddaughter of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Baruch Wolski, grandson of survivors, Austria.
Frank Amahran, grandson of survivor, United States.
Eve Spangler, granddaughter of Holocaust NON-survivor, United States.
Gil Medovoy, grandchild of Fela Hornstein who lost her enitre family in Poland during the Nazi genocide, United States.
Michael Hoffman, grandson of survivors, rest of family killed in Poland during Holocaust, live in El Salvador.
Sarah Hogarth, granddaughter of a survivor whose entire family was killed at Auschwitz, United States.
Tibby Brooks, granddaughter, niece, and cousin of victims of Nazis in Ukraine. Lives in United States.
Dan Berger, grandson of survivor, United States.
Dani Baurer, granddaughter of Baruch Pollack, survivor of Auschwitz. Lives in United States.
Talia Baurer, granddaughter of a survivor, United States.
Evan Cofsky, grandson of survivor, UK.
Annie Sicherman, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Anna Heyman, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
Maya Ober, granddaughter of survivor and relative of deceased in Teresienstadt and Auschwitz, Tel Aviv.
Anne Haan, granddaughter of Joseph Slagter, survivor of Auschwitz. Lives in The Netherlands.
Oliver Ginsberg, grandson of victim, Germany.
Alexia Zdral, granddaughter of Polish survivors, United States.
Mitchel Bollag, grandson of Stanislaus Eisner, who was living in Czechoslovakia before being sent to a concentration camp. United States.
Vivienne Porzsolt, granddaughter of victims of Nazi genocide, Australia.
Lisa Nessan, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Kally Alexandrou, granddaughter of survivors, Australia.
Laura Ostrow, granddaughter of survivors, United States
Anette Jacobson, granddaughter of relatives killed, town of Kamen Kashirsk, Poland. Lives in United States.
Tamar Yaron (Teresa Werner), granddaughter and niece of victims of the Nazi genocide in Poland, Israel.
Antonio Roman-Alcalá, grandson of survivor, United States.
Jeremy Luban, grandson of survivor, United States.
Heather West, granddaughter of survivors and relative of other victims, United States.
Jeff Ethan Au Green, grandson of survivor who escaped from a Nazi work camp and hid in the Polish-Ukranian forest, United States.
Johanna Haan, daughter and granddaughter of victims in the Netherlands. Lives in the Netherlands.
Aron Ben Miriam, son of and nephew of survivors from Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen, Salzwedel, Lodz ghetto. Lives in United States.
Noa Shaindlinger, granddaughter of four holocaust survivors, Canada.
Merilyn Moos, granddaughter, cousin and niece murdered victims, UK.
Ruth Tenne, granddaughter and relative of those who perished in Warsaw Ghetto, London.
Craig Berman, grandson of Holocaust survivors, UK.
Nell Hirschmann-Levy, granddaughter of survivors from Germany. Lives in United States.
Osha Neumann, grandson of Gertrud Neumann who died in Theresienstadt. Lives in United States.
Georg Frankl, Grandson of survivor Ernst-Immo Frankl who survived German work camp. Lives in Germany.
Julian Drix, grandson of two survivors from Poland, including survivor and escapee from liquidated Janowska concentration camp in Lwow, Poland. Lives in United States.
Katrina Mayer, grandson and relative of victims, UK.
Avigail Abarbanel, granddaughter of survivors, Scotland.
Denni Turp, granddaughter of Michael Prooth, survivor, UK.
Fenya Fischler, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
Yakira Teitel, granddaughter of German Jewish refugees, great-granddaughter of survivor, United States.
Sarah, granddaughter of survivor, the Netherlands.
Susan Koppelman, granddaughter of survivor, United States
Hana Umeda, granddaughter of survivor, Warsaw.
Jordan Silverstein, grandson of two survivors, Canada.
Daniela Petuchowski, granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Aaron Lerner, grandson of survivors, United States.
Judith Bernstein, granddaughter of Holocaust victims in Auschwitz, Germany.
Samantha Wischnia, granddaughter and great niece of survivors from Poland, United States.
Elizabeth Wischnia, granddaughter and grand niece of three holocaust survivors, great aunt worked for Schindler, United States.
Daniel Waterman, grandson of survivor, The Netherlands.
Elana Baurer, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
Pablo Roman-Alcala, grandson of participant in the kindertransport and survivor, Germany.
Karine Abdel Malek, grandchild of survivor, Henri Waisman, Morocco.
Elana Baurer, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
Lillian Brown, granddaughter of survivor, United States.
Devin Cahn, grandson of survivors, United States.
Daniel Lévyne, grandson of a deportee, France.
Emilie Ferreira, granddaughter of survivors, Switzerland.
Chaim Neslen, grandchild of many victims and friend of many survivors, UK.
Ann Jungmann, granddaughter to three victims, UK.
Ellie Schling, granddaughter of a survivor, UK.
Danny Katch, grandson of survivors, United States.
Elisa Levi, granddaughter of three survivors, United States.
Karen Pomer, granddaughter of member of Dutch resistance and survivor of Bergen Belsen. Now lives in the United States.
Gilda Mitchell Katz, granddaughter of survivors, uncle and aunt killed In Dombrova, Canada.
Smadar Carmon, my grandparents and uncle were killed in the camps, Canada.
Dana Newfield, granddaughter of survivor and relative of many murdered, United States.
Ilana Guslits, granddaughter of two Polish survivors, Canada.
Gerald Coles-Kolsky, grandson of victims in Poland and France, United States.
Lesley Swain, granddaughter and cousin of survivors, UK.
Myera Waese, granddaughter of survivors of Bergen Belsen, Canada.
Ronni Seidman, grandchild of survivors. United States.
Mike Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
Nance Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
Karen Shatzkin, grandchild of survivors, some family members murdered and some who died in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. United States.
Myriam Burger, granddaughter of survivor. United States.
Andre Burger, grandson of survivor Myriam Cohn, great-grandson of Sylvia Cohn and great-nephew of Esther Lore Cohn, both murdered in Auschwitz, United States.
Great-grandchildren of survivors

Natalie Rothman, great granddaughter of Holocaust victims in Warsaw. Now lives in Canada.
Yotam Amit, great-grandson of Polish Jew who fled Poland, United States.
Daniel Boyarin, great grandson of victims of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Maria Luban, great-granddaughter of survivors of the Holocaust, United States.
Mimi Erlich, great-granddaughter of Holocaust victim, United States.
Olivia Kraus, great-grandaughter of victims, granddaughter and daughter of family that fled Austria and Czechoslovakia. Lives in United States.
Emily (Chisefsky) Alma, great granddaughter and great grandniece of victims in Bialystok, Poland, United States.
Inbal Amin, great-granddaughter of a mother and son that escaped and related to plenty that didn’t, United States.
Matteo Luban, great-granddaughter of survivors, United States.
Saira Weiner, greatgranddaughter and niece of those murdered in the Holocaust, granddaughter of survivors, UK.
Andrea Isaak, great-granddaughter of survivor, Canada.
Alan Lott, great-grandson of a number of relatives lost, United States.
Sara Wines, great-granddaughter of a survivor and great-great granddaughter of victims, United States.
Other relatives of survivors

Terri Ginsberg, niece of a survivor of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Nathan Pollack, relative of Holocaust survivors and victims, United States.
Marcy Winograd, relatives of victims, United States.
Rabbi Borukh Goldberg, relative of many victims, United States.
Martin Davidson, great-nephew of victims who lived in the Netherlands, Spain.
Miriam Pickens, relative of survivors, United States.
Dorothy Werner, spouse of survivor, United States.
Hyman and Hazel Rochman, relatives of Holocaust victims, United States.
Rich Siegel, cousin of victims who were rounded up and shot in town square of Czestochowa, Poland. Lives in United States.
Ignacio Israel Cruz-Lara, relative of survivor, Mexico.
Debra Stuckgold, relative of survivors, United States.
Joel Kovel, relatives killed at Babi Yar, United States.
Carol Krauthamer Smith, niece of survivors of the Nazi genocide, United States.
Chandra Ahuva Hauptman, relatives from grandfather’s family died in Lodz ghetto, one survivor cousin and many deceased from Auschwitz, United States.
Shelly Weiss, relative of Holocaust victims, United States.
Carol Sanders, niece and cousin of victims of Holocaust in Poland, United States.
Sandra Rosen, great-niece and cousin of survivors, United States.
Raquel Hiller, relative of victims in Poland. Now lives in Mexico.
Alex Kantrowitz, most of father’s family murdered Nesvizh, Belarus 1941. Lives in United States.
Michael Steven Smith, many relatives were killed in Hungary. Lives in United States.
Linda Moore, relative of survivors and victims, United States.
Juliet VanEenwyk, niece and cousin of Hungarian survivors, United States.
Anya Achtenberg, grand niece, niece, cousin of victims tortured and murdered in Ukraine. Lives in United States.
Betsy Wolf-Graves, great niece of uncle who shot himself as he was about to be arrested by Nazis, United States.
Abecassis Pierre, grand-uncle died in concentration camp, France.
Robert Rosenthal, great-nephew and cousin of survivors from Poland. Lives in United States.
Régine Bohar, relative of victims sent to Auschwitz, Canada.
Denise Rickles, relative of survivors and victims in Poland. Lives in United States.
Louis Hirsch, relative of victims, United States.
Concepción Marcos, relative of victim, Spain.
George Sved, relative of victim, Spain.
Judith Berlowitz, relative of victims and survivors, United States.
Rebecca Sturgeon, descendant of Holocaust survivor from Amsterdam. Lives in UK.
Justin Levy, relative of victims and survivors, Ireland.
Sam Semoff, relative of survivors and victims, UK.
Leah Brown Klein, daughter-in-law of survivors Miki and Etu Fixler Klein, United States
Karen Malpede, spouse of hidden child who then fled Germany. Lives in United States
Michel Euvrard, husband of survivor, France.
Walter Ebmeyer, grandnephew of three Auschwitz victims and one survivor now living in Jerusalem, United States.
Garrett Wright, relative of victims and survivors, United States.
Lynne Lopez-Salzedo, descendant of three Auschwitz victims, United States.
Renee Leavy, 86 victims in my mother’s family, United States.
Steven Kohn, 182 victims in my grandparents’ families, United States.
Dorah Rosen Shuey, relative of many victims and 4 survivors, United States.
Carol Lipton, cousin of survivors, United States.
Catherine Bruckner, descendent of Czech Jewish victims of the holocaust, UK.
Susan Rae Goldstein, carrying the name of my great-aunt Rose Frankel, from Poland and murdered along with many other family members, Canada.
Jordan Elgrably, nephew of Marcelle Elgrably, killed in Auschwitz, United States.
Olivia M Hudis, relative of Auschwitz victims, United States.
Peter Finkelstein, relative of victims and survivors, Germany.
Colin Merrin, descendant of Polish and Belarusian Jewish victims, UK.

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Not in My Name – Holocaust Survivor speaks out about Gaza. Reblogged from Global Research.

Regime Change in Iraq: Standing in Washington’s Way. Why Obama Wants Maliki RemovedThe Ebola Outbreak: U.S. Sponsored Bioterror?The ISIS Islamic Terrorists are Supported by the US, Israel and Saudi ArabiaCops Gone Wild: The Militarization of Law Enforcement in AmericaCensorship in Hollywood: Celebrities Being Blacklisted by Pro-Israeli Media?“The Russian Threat”: Washington Chokes Truth With Lies
Not In My Name: Condemning the Massacre of Palestinians in Gaza: Statement of Jewish Holocaust Survivors

By Suzanne Weiss
Global Research, August 16, 2014
Socialist Project
Region: Middle East & North Africa
Theme: Crimes against Humanity
In-depth Report: PALESTINE
8 0 2 19

suzanne-weiss
m proud to join more than 250 Jewish Holocaust survivors and descendants of survivors in condemning “the massacre of Palestinians in Gaza” and “the ongoing genocide of the Palestinian people.” Our statement of solidarity calls for “an immediate end to the siege against and the blockade of Gaza” and a “full economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel.”

Suzanne Weiss speaking at the “Lift The Siege” rally in Toronto, 10 January 2009.

We believe that “never again,” the often-repeated lesson of Hitler’s Holocaust, “must mean never again for anyone!” – especially the Palestinians.

We also protest the full-page advertisement published in the New York Times and elsewhere by Zionist Elie Wiesel that holds Palestinians responsible for the deaths of the hundreds of Palestinian children in Gaza killed by Israeli bombs. “Nothing can justify bombing UN shelters, homes, hospitals and universities,” we say. Wiesel, a Nobel laureate and Holocaust survivor, accuses the Palestinian resistance group Hamas for having supposedly embraced a “death cult” of “child sacrifice” because Hamas has launched rockets against Israel. In reality, it is Israel that has deliberately bombarded densely packed civilian residential areas, says Raji Sourani, director of the Palestinian Center for Human Rights. Among the Israeli targets was a UN school in Rafah being used as a shelter – an attack that even the U.S. State Department termed “appalling” and “disgraceful.”

The ‘Gaza Doctrine’

Sourani calls Israel’s actions the “Gaza Doctrine” – a “policy of collective punishment” in which “disproportionate force is used to cause terror among the civilian population to exert political pressure” on their government. “To bomb densely packed Gaza homes is a war crime,” he says.

Such collective punishment was the Nazis’ standard response to acts of resistance to their genocidal rule during the Second World War. When Czech resisters assassinated Reinhard Heydrich, a principal architect of the Jewish Holocaust, the Nazis slaughtered more than 1,300 civilians in reprisal.

The Nazis took such actions in France, where I lived then as a child. In June 1944, the village of Oradour, about 100 miles from where I was hidden at the time, was attacked by a German Waffen-SS detachment, based on false reports that a German commander was held prisoner there. In a matter of hours, 600 civilians were killed.

Jewish fighters were a leading force in the armed resistance in France, as they were in other countries across Europe. And even where Jews were isolated in ghettos and concentration camps, they nonetheless found ways to fight back.

In the celebrated 1943 Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, a mere 750 fighters, armed with primitive weapons smuggled along with food through hand-dug tunnels, held out for a month, before heavily armed Nazis extinguished resistance, bombing and leveling the ghetto to the ground.

There were Nazi reprisals across Europe. They killed 205 children at Oradour – but no one has ever accused the heroic resisters of being a “death cult of child sacrifice.”

Solidarity in the Face of Overwhelming Odds

At the time of these events, I was marked for death by the Nazis. My story is an example of building solidarity in the face of overwhelming odds.

In 1942, the French police began rounding up Jewish residents by the tens of thousands – men, women and children – handing them over to the Nazis to be killed at Auschwitz, the death camp in Poland. Among the victims was my mother, who died in Auschwitz in 1943. The Nazis’ goal was to round up, deport and kill all the Jews in France – as was being done throughout Europe. But amid this terrible slaughter, a wave of revulsion grew in France against the attack on the Jews. Through the efforts of both social organizations and individual initiatives, thousands of Jews were hidden. Altogether, three-quarters of the French Jews escaped the Holocaust.

The first big raid of July 1942 caught Jewish organizations in France by surprise. It was only then that the Jewish population realized that their children had to be hidden. They embraced the slogan, “Save the children by dispersing them.” Searches were initiated for safe havens, false papers were made, and transport arranged in an atmosphere of urgency and despair. More than 10,000 Jewish children were taken from their families and hidden. I was among them. In 1943, when I was 2 years old, a resistance organization took charge of my care and placed me with a peasant family in Auvergne, a farming region in south-central France.

Recently, I went back to Auvergne with my partner, John Riddell, to learn how it was that I had been saved. I spoke to people in Auvergne who remembered those years. The Jewish children were placed discreetly, away from the towns and sometimes in remote hamlets. Yet they lived in the open, going to school and to church.

Why were they not betrayed to the police? The villagers protected them, thus putting their own life and that of their families at risk. Despite the dangers, peasants took the children with love into their tightly knit communities.

The children were saved, in most cases, by the actions not of individual heroes but of entire communities, who hid them not in cellars but in plain view. They were saved by a resistance that embraced not only the guerrilla combatants, but those who set up civilian networks to defy anti-Jewish decrees, and, in a different way, by those who looked the other way, who did not ask questions, and who – even if hostile to the presence of Jews – did not betray them.

The resistance embraced French and immigrants; Christians, Jews and Muslims; and refugees from Spain, Italy and German-occupied territories. This was a solidarity born of common social experience of farmers, working people and those that they influenced.

End the Blockade of Gaza

The situation in Gaza is unlike that faced by Europe’s Jews under Hitler. The Israeli government has converted the territory into the world’s largest concentration camp, sealed off and subjected to periodic and murderous bombardment. For the people of Gaza, there is no place to shelter their children; no friendly countryside that could provide refuge.

No wonder that in Gaza, in the words of Raji Sourani, “a cease-fire is not enough. We demand justice. We demand to be treated like human beings. We demand an end to the closure of the Gaza Strip.”

And in the words of London writer and journalist Tariq Ali, our politicians “have to understand that there is no equivalence between the Palestinian resistance and the Israeli occupation. When a country is occupied, resistance emerges. If you want no rockets being fired, no tunnels being dug, get out of Gaza.”

But the people of Gaza do not stand alone. To quote Barnaby Raine, a student organizer of a Jewish Bloc against Zionism addressing a solidarity rally in London on August 9, “People from all backgrounds, from all walks of life, all over the world, come together and say in our thousands, ‘We are all Palestinians.’”

Today, the people of the world are unequivocally vocal in their denunciation of Israeli apartheid and Israeli slaughter. They express this in repeated gigantic demonstrations with signs and banners calling out: end to the killing in Gaza, lift the siege of Gaza, freedom for Palestine.

All Out for Gaza
“All Out for Gaza” rally in Toronto, 10 August 2014.

Several governments – Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Peru and Venezuela – have taken actions against the Israeli assault, including boycott and sanctions.

Today, our human dignity is challenged by Israel’s cruelty toward the Palestinians. Palestinians call for a world movement of solidarity. We must speak out for their right to defend their lives and their homelands. We support their call to create economic pressure on Israel with a campaign of boycott, divestment and sanctions(BDS).

The demands of this campaign are: For the right of Palestinians to return to their homeland, equal rights for Palestinians in Israel and an end to the Israeli occupation. Today the boycott campaign is winning increasing support on several continents.

Let us redouble our efforts for boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israeli apartheid.

Free Gaza! Palestine shall be free! •

Suzanne Weiss is a Holocaust survivor based in Toronto, Canada. She is a member of the Coalition Against Israeli Apartheid and Not In Our Name: Jewish Voices Opposing Zionism.

Ferguson Withdraws Militarized Police Force – Reblogged from Common Dreams

Saturday, August 16, 2014
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Ferguson Withdraws Militarized Police Force

Published on
Friday, August 15, 2014
byCommon Dreams
Ferguson Withdraws Militarized Police Force
With tear gas and riot police out, demonstrators walk in peace for justice
byAndrea Germanos, staff writer

A protest against police brutality on Aug. 14. (Photo: Elvert Barnes/CC BY-SA 2.0/flickr)

“It feels like there’s been a military occupation lifted off of the area,” Patricia Bynes, Democratic Committeewoman of Ferguson Township, told Democracy Now! Friday.

Such was the change in atmosphere in Ferguson, Missouri, where daily protests since the police shooting on Saturday of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown had been met with tear gas, rubber bullets and tanks, bringing widespread criticism to the nation’s increasingly militarized police departments and evoking images of civil rights battles of the past.

“What’s gone on here over the last few days is not what Missouri is about. It’s not what Ferguson is about,” Gov. Jay Nixon said. “This is a place where people work, go to school, raise their families, go to church. But lately it’s looked a little bit more like a war zone and that’s unacceptable.”

Nixon said Thursday that the security responsibilities for Ferguson would be transferred to the Missouri State Highway Patrol and led by Capt. Ron Johnson, a native of the area.

Johnson, who is black, announced that his team would be using “a different approach,” and said that police would respect “the anger and fear” that has gripped Ferguson’s residents. State troopers walked with demonstrators on Thursday night, when no riot police of tear gas were present, and some of the protestors warmly greeted Johnson.

Standing in front of demonstrators, Johnson held up a photo of Brown and told CNN, “This is why we’re here.” Watch the video below:

Following the police power transfer, the Guardian reported, “a carnival-like demonstration filled the center of the city.” The new atmosphere was described by the Associated Press as “almost jubilant.”

“This is totally different. Now we’re being treated with respect,” 41-year-old Pedro Smith, 41, who has been taking part in the protests, told AP.

St. Louis alderman Antonio French, who was arrested during the demonstration on Wednesday, praised the change, telling CNN, “Really, it has been the police presence, the heavy-handed presence, which has escalated the situation, and I think led to the violence each night. And so it’s good to see this new approach,” he said.

Missouri state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, suspects that Nixon’s announcement was sparked not by the militarized police response against the protesters but the arrests of two journalists covering the protests.

“The treatment that the media received … was what many of the protesters have received the last four days,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch quotes Nasheed as saying. “Only when the media get attacked in a negative manner by the police officers, only then does the governor come out and speak.”

In various cities across the nation, solidarity protests were held. In Baltimore and New York City on Thursday, chants of “Whose streets? Our streets!” rang out from the streets.

Police in Ferguson revealed Friday that the officer who shot Michael Brown is Darren Wilson.

See some of the images from Ferguson that are emerging on Twitter:

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Ferguson Withdraws Militarized Police Force

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Ferguson Withdraws Militarized Police Force

With tear gas and riot police out, demonstrators walk in peace for justice

 

A protest against police brutality on Aug. 14. (Photo: Elvert Barnes/CC BY-SA 2.0/flickr)

 

“It feels like there’s been a military occupation lifted off of the area,” Patricia Bynes, Democratic Committeewoman of Ferguson Township, told Democracy Now! Friday.

Such was the change in atmosphere in Ferguson, Missouri, where daily protests since the police shooting on Saturday of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown had been met with tear gas, rubber bullets and tanks, bringing widespread criticism to the nation’s increasingly militarized police departments and evoking images of civil rights battles of the past.

“What’s gone on here over the last few days is not what Missouri is about. It’s not what Ferguson is about,” Gov. Jay Nixon said. “This is a place where people work, go to school, raise their families, go to church. But lately it’s looked a little bit more like a war zone and that’s unacceptable.”

Nixon said Thursday that the security responsibilities for Ferguson would be transferred to the Missouri State Highway Patrol and led by Capt. Ron Johnson, a native of the area.

Johnson, who is black, announced that his team would be using “a different approach,” and said that police would respect “the anger and fear” that has gripped Ferguson’s residents. State troopers walked with demonstrators on Thursday night, when no riot police of tear gas were present, and some of the protestors warmly greeted Johnson.

Standing in front of demonstrators, Johnson held up a photo of Brown and told CNN, “This is why we’re here.” Watch the video below:

Following the police power transfer, the Guardian reported, “a carnival-like demonstration filled the center of the city.” The new atmosphere was described by the Associated Press as “almost jubilant.”

“This is totally different. Now we’re being treated with respect,” 41-year-old Pedro Smith, 41, who has been taking part in the protests, told AP.

St. Louis alderman Antonio French, who was arrested during the demonstration on Wednesday, praised the change, telling CNN, “Really, it has been the police presence, the heavy-handed presence, which has escalated the situation, and I think led to the violence each night. And so it’s good to see this new approach,” he said.

Missouri state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, suspects that Nixon’s announcement was sparked not by the militarized police response against the protesters but the arrests of two journalists covering the protests.

“The treatment that the media received … was what many of the protesters have received the last four days,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch quotes Nasheed as saying. “Only when the media get attacked in a negative manner by the police officers, only then does the governor come out and speak.”

In various cities across the nation, solidarity protests were held. In Baltimore and New York City on Thursday, chants of “Whose streets? Our streets!” rang out from the streets.

Police in Ferguson revealed Friday that the officer who shot Michael Brown is Darren Wilson.

See some of the images from Ferguson that are emerging on Twitter:

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87% of UK public back sending Cameron cabinet to Iraq

Now wouldn’t peace suddenly break out if politicians were sent into the front line?
The amount of money made by weapons manufacturers is obscene. A very simple change in the law that meant they were responsible for the death and destruction they cause would change the course of history.
Bring it on!
xxxx

Pride's Purge

(satire?)

The majority of Britons would support sending David Cameron’s entire cabinet of ministers into Iraq and a similar percentage would support air dropping Nick Clegg onto the front lines from a high altitude to support British involvement in humanitarian efforts,

In a ComRes poll for ITV News, a mere 13% of British people opposed the idea of dispatching the chancellor George Osborne alongside the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan Smith to fight brutal ISIS militia forces in northern Iraq, while a massive 84% agreed with air dropping boxes containing Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander and the Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt onto Mount Sinjar to aid refugees trapped there.

Brits were also found to be more likely to support than oppose deploying the Prime Minister David Cameron on a long-term mission into Iraq to personally fight against Islamic State militants, with as many as 45% in favour of shipping him over there for a long-term deployment of as long as…

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No More Wars – what you can do. Reblogged from Starving The War Machine. Ines Radman.

Starving The War Machine

No More Wars

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Time Is Running Out

Time For Action Is Now

Hello my human friend, 
We don’t know each other yet but I am hoping that we will soon.  As you know there are literally thousands of different organizations globally claiming to be working towards Peace and claiming to working on stopping wars, but how many have succeeded in either? Do you know why they have failed? 
They have failed because they asked you to donate, to hand over your responsibility to them and you believed you were giving to  a good cause. The cause is always good, but the cause is no longer making this world a better place. 
 
We believe that we have found the solution to ending wars and enacting PEACE, but the solution is not ours, YOU are the solution. Starting today, you will visit our blog, read the Mission Statement and Instructions on what YOU need to do to bring an end to all wars. 
 
Please set aside your skepticism, your judgments, your need to use logic as to why it would work or not work, we don’t have time for these thoughts, hundreds of people are dying each day in the name of Peace. Unless you have a better solution, I can’t see why you need to think about it. 
Do your job, you are the one Peace is waiting for, you are responsible for the mess we have created and only YOU can bring Peace to this by starving the banks of YOUR money, by boycotting companies that fund wars, by not spending any money during the upcoming holidays, instead, give your loved ones a Card that says “Thank you for contributing to Peace”. 
It’s a small sacrifice to ask of you, but it will bring a huge reward, something we have never experienced for thousands of years, imagine that, we have never had WORLD PEACE. 
 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Starving-the-War-Machine/710578012322641
 
We expect you there today, now, this moment, time is running out and you know this. 
Please pass this letter to everyone you know, whether you think or believe they will act on it or not, it’s your responsibility to give them the choice of either War or Peace. 
 
Much love and blessings to you, 
Ines Radman
Split Croatia 
You can read my blog at : http://www.inesradman.wordpress.com or visit my Facebook page. 
 
I don’t know about you, but I’m tired of bad news I’m tired of children dying each day because we are silent about it. 
 
Please do your part, I have done mine. 

Dr Mona El-Farrar – Visiting Family and Khuza’a. Utter Devastation.

Reblogged from Middle East Children’s Alliance latest newsletter.

 

Donate for  Emergency Aid to Gaza!
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Dear Friends,
 
I’m writing now from my home, but I still feel dizzy from shock and nauseated by the sights and smells on my visit to Khan Younis and Khuza’a.
 
Yesterday I decided to use the opportunity of the ceasefire to visit my family in Khan Younis. I especially wanted to see my sister who had open heart surgery before Israel’s assault. I hadn’t seen her for 36 days. I’m lucky that I have enough fuel in my car to drive 24 kilometers (15 miles) so I struck out towards the south.
 
I drove down Salaheddin Road and passed rubble from mosques, houses, and factories. Some buildings were destroyed completely and some partially. Later on in my drive, I saw dozens of big trees uprooted and smashed, fruit trees destroyed and farms and gardens decimated and ruined. The Israeli bombs were aimed to destroy the infrastructure, to destroy Gaza’s economy. Even the main cookie factory was targeted and destroyed.
 
I passed UN trucks distributing food to people in long lines. This siege and assault by the Israelis has made everyone in the Gaza Strip live as a refugee, missing basic needs and struggling to survive. 
 
When I drove up to my family’s place in Khan Younis, it was a very emotional moment. We’ve lost many family members and, excuse me, my friends, I’m not going to talk about this meeting because every family in Gaza is going through the same thing. 
 
My sister and relatives decided they wanted to go to see Khuza’a, a village located east of Khan Younis. At first I didn’t want to go to Khuza’a. I didn’t want to be reminded of the massacre, to witness more horrors. But I decided to go so I could give you, my friends from MECA, and others living outside of Gaza my first-hand account. I know you are following the news closely but I also know the news might not tell you what has gone on and is going on in Gaza.
 
As we set out to the east, my niece pointed out the devastation, “You can see where the Israeli tanks were—here and here.” When we came to the village Abbasan, there was an Israeli military vehicle destroyed. Palestinian flags were flying from it and Palestinian children were playing on it while their families stood watching them.
 
We continued toward Khuza’a. It was a model Palestinian agricultural village with open fields and green everywhere. They had fruit trees and vegetable fields. But there was nothing left of the village I remembered.
 
The smell and the sights we saw were shocking. The moment we parked and I got out, a very strange smell hit us—the smell of dead bodies. That smell will never leave me; it is still stuck in my nose. We saw totally flattened houses and other houses partially destroyed.  It reminded me of pictures from war-torn areas where years of fighting erased a village. I could tell that something huge and terrible had happened here, the rubble and the destruction were extreme. Some villagers told us they had found two bodies in the rubble a couple of hours before we arrived. Still people were searching the ruins for their relative’s remains. Many times I had to stop myself from vomiting because the smell was so strong. 
 
This Israeli assault has hit the Palestinian people more deeply than the last two military attacks. This one is even more deadly and destructive. Whole neighborhoods and villages have been wiped off the map.
 
I ask myself now how can we start again? 
 

From Gaza, with love,

Dr. Mona El-Farra
MECA Director of Gaza Projects
 

 

DHP actual spend reveals it is time to radically rethink the impacts of welfare reforms

Very good, thorough painstaking research. We mustn’t forget the human stories behind these figures – Stephanie Bottrill who committed suicide because she could not afford to pay the bedroom tax even though she had attempted to downsize died nearly a year ago. Her inquest is being held in Birmingham soon. Let’s hope the coroner speaks out and up for those being hounded and puts the blame fairly and squarely where it belongs.
Government and local councils have a duty of care and it’s time they shouldered these responsibilities!
xxxx

DWP To Amputee Veteran: ‘Get A Job. Doesn’t Matter How You Travel.’

I think the key words are, “a little more care and compassion.”
Yes, IDS, bucket loads of it!
XXXXXX

Same Difference

This is how we treat our veterans- 100 years since World War 1.

GET a job – but it does not matter if you cannot travel there.

That’s what amputee Gordon Lang has been told by the Department of Work and Pensions.

Mr Lang appealed against a decision to stop his Employment Support Allowance after he was told he should be able to work.

But that was rejected and he has now lost his ESA. The DWP said it looked at if he could work, not how he might travel to and from a job.

The government department said he might work at home or an employer could supply transport.

The former Royal Marine, who served in the Falklands conflict said: ‘There probably are (jobs that come with transport) but certainly not in Gosport.

‘I’m absolutely gutted. I did 25 years in the services. I took about a year after…

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